Environment Committee

The Maggie Lakes Owners Association (MLOA) Environmental Committee is dedicated to the preservation, protection, and stewardship of the lakes, streams, and forests found within the MLOA development. The purpose of the committee is to establish procedures and practices that will enforce all environmental standards outlined in our Protective Covenants. The committee gives oversight and makes recommendations to the MLOA Board and its members, that will maintain continuity along the lakes and their shorelines, restrict contaminating substances, inhibit shoreline erosion, prevent invasive species, preserve and enhance the forest, maintain appropriate water levels and water quality, and maintain the fish population and wildlife habitat within the properties. Below you will find a wealth of information in the areas of Lakes and Shorelines, Forest Management, Wildlife, and Invasive Species. Included is additional helpful information and links to topics such as obtaining a permit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality when considering changes to the shoreline area or floodplain on our properties, fishing and hunting regulations as well as fishing regulations specific to the West Maggie, Big Maggie and Little Maggie Lakes. We are always looking for more association members to be involved in the environmental committee. Please contact any MOLA Board Member if you are interested.

Lakes and Streams

The protection of our lakes from invasive species, erosion, and pollutants is vital to maintain water quality, healthy fish populations, and attracting wildlife. Educating oneself on lake ecology and engaging in monitoring programs are ways to understand and better protect our lakes. MLOA is a member of the Michigan Lakes and Streams Association and we participate in the MiCorps Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP). The Michigan Lakes and Steams Association web site https://mymlsa.org/ has many links to understanding lake ecology, management practices, and invasive species prevention and identification. For more information specifically on lake ecology visit the link: Understanding lake ecology https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Understanding_Lake_Ecology.pdf You can find the monitoring reports for the years the program has been active at this link - https://micorps.net/lake- monitoring/individual-lake-reports/.

Invasive Species:

Prevention: It Is Everyone’s Responsibility Preventing invasive species from entering a lake is vital. Many of the public access lakes surrounding our development are contaminated with aggressive, non-native invaders. Aquatic plants and animals such as Eruasian Milfoil and Zebra Mussels can choke out or compete with native plants and animals, decimate fish populations, make boat navigation difficult, and impede recreation. Once established, many invasive species cannot be eradicated. Attempts to remove or control invasive species can be expensive and time consuming. Lake invasive species can also reduce property values. To reduce the risk of contaminating our waters the Maggie Lakes are a CLOSED SYSTEM. This means that each lake frontage property owner should designate the boat(s) for use on the lake their property fronts. This boat should not be used on any other body of water. Outlying parcel owners wishing to access Big Maggie Lake should also have a boat that is only used on Big Maggie and no other body of water. Boats must have a sticker specific for the lake it is to be used on. Other personal watercraft, such as canoes, kayaks and paddleboards should also be specifically designated for each lake and not used on any other body of water. Boat and watercraft stickers can be obtained from the Maggie Lakes Treasurer / Secretary. Identification: Early identification can help in preventing invasive species from becoming established. There are numerous species of invasive plants and animals. For more information follow the link to a Field Guide to Invasive Plants https://mymlsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Invasive_Plants.pdf and a Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species https://mymlsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Aquatic_Invasive_Species.pdf

Water Quality:

Many things can affect water quality such as excessive nutrients or pollutants entering the lake or stream. Nutrient sources, such as soil, fertilizer or leaky septic systems can increase phosphorus and nitrogen entering the lake thus promoting algae blooms. Pollutants such as gasoline, oil, or other chemicals can also affect the water quality. Prevention: Erosion control: Erosion of shorelines allows soil, other organic materials and fertilizers to enter the water. Creating or maintaining a buffer zone (natural riparian vegetation) between our homes, lawns and the lake can prevent erosion. Native plants, shrubs, and trees are excellent for a buffer zone. Prevent killing of shoreline vegetation by not storing boats or other objects on the shore. For more information on native shoreline and erosion prevention visit these websites: Natural shoreline landscapes on Michigan’s inland lakes: http://www.hlca.us/pdf/Guidebook%20- %20Michigan%20Shoreline%20Landscapes.pdf Natural shorelines for inland lakes: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/deq/wrd-natural-shorelines-inland-lakes_366530_7.pdf Pollution: Avoid gasoline and oil spills when filling or servicing your boat. Fishing Regulations: Fishing guidelines and regulations have been established for each lake. These guidelines and regulations are to help ensure a healthy and productive fishery now and for future generations. Please read and familiarize yourself, family and guests with these regulations. o Little-Maggie Lake Fishing Regulations o Big Maggie Lake Fishing Regulations o Regulations for West Maggie All residents who fish Big Maggie Lake are encouraged to help generate data on the lake's fish population by participating in our voluntary Fish Survey. The survey form and additional information is in the PDF you can download here.

Forests and Fields

Maintaining the health of our forests and fields is important for attracting wildlife and keeping the aesthetics of our MLOA property. Controlling and preventing invasive species and a forest management plan are important for healthy forests and fields. Invasive species: As with aquatic invasive plants and animals, terrestrial invasive species(those found on land) can choke out or compete with native species. Educating yourself on the identification, prevention, control and removal of these invasive species will improve the quality of your property and the Associations. For information on these aggressive invaders visits these links: o A Field Identification Guide to Invasive Plants in Michigan’s Natural Communities: https://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/invasive-species/InvasivePlantsFieldGuide.pdf o The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN): https://www.misin.msu.edu/apps/ Field guide to invasive plants. This link has both terrestrial and aquatic invasive plants: https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Invasive_Plants.pdf Michigan’s Terrestrial Invasive Species State Management Plan: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/Terrestrial_invasivesp_plan_618659_7.pdf

Forest Management:

Forest management focuses on managing vegetation, restoring ecosystems, reducing hazards, and maintaining forest health. Forests are managed for specific goals and objectives set by the landowner. These objectives may focus on recreation, restoring forest health and fire resiliency or developing wildlife habitat. Forest management planning is a process that usually produces a written management plan. Forests by their nature are long-term enterprises, and the forest owner’s expected outcomes, like the forest conditions many years into the future, require actions today and over time to ensure these outcomes occur. Forest management planning does not always involve management objectives that include timber directly, but most forest management objectives do involve active forest management and timber at least indirectly. For example, timber must be manipulated to achieve wildlife habitat objectives, to produce recreation opportunities, or to produce exceptional vistas. Timber cutting or logging may be part of a forest management plan and can improve the overall health of a forest if done properly. Our protective covenants (#8) prohibit commercial timbering but permit thinning of over mature trees. The association encourages owners to maintain healthy forests on their property and this may include selective timber cutting. The association has specific guidelines on logging, specifically requiring a forest management plan be developed, shared with and approved by the MLOA Board of Directors, before any logging is performed. A good and free place to start if you are thinking about the health of your forest is to contact our county FAP Forester, Carly DeVet. Free services provided by the office include on-site property evaluation, tree and shrub planting recommendations, wildlife habitat enhancement recommendations, and tree insect and disease identification. If you have any questions or are interested in managing your property, call Carly at (906) 236-5108 or (906) 875-3765 or email at fap.iron.baraga@macd.org for a free site visit. For more information the Iron/Baraga Conservation District website is ironbaragacd.org/landowner-forestry If you decide to do a forest management plan, the FAP County Forester can help connect you with a qualified Consulting Forester. For a fee, the forester you choose to work with will write a management plan and help you execute the plan. If your plan includes timber cutting, the forester would select and mark the trees to be cut and would send out bids to loggers in the area to get you the best logging contract. Here is a list of foresters that your Association neighbors have consulted with: Terry Read https://upforestresources.com 906-265-5170 Brock VanOss, VanOss Forestry Services https://vanossforestry.com (906) 874-0777
Lake near Alpha, Lakeside Property, Crystal Falls Lake to Live on, Available property on a lake, no wak lake to live on, private lake to live on, live on lake with no public access
© 2022 Maggie Lakes Owners Association
Maggie Lakes
Time on the lake restores the soul!
Maggie Lakes Owners - Time on the lake restores the soul!
Maggie Lakes Owners Association assists owners and prospective owners, and also improves and maintains forest, lakes, and streams within its boundaries.
Lake near Alpha, Lakeside Property, Crystal Falls Lake to Live on, Available property on a lake, no wak lake to live on, private lake to live on, live on lake with no public access

Environment Committee

The Maggie Lakes Owners Association (MLOA) Environmental Committee is dedicated to the preservation, protection, and stewardship of the lakes, streams, and forests found within the MLOA development. The purpose of the committee is to establish procedures and practices that will enforce all environmental standards outlined in our Protective Covenants. The committee gives oversight and makes recommendations to the MLOA Board and its members, that will maintain continuity along the lakes and their shorelines, restrict contaminating substances, inhibit shoreline erosion, prevent invasive species, preserve and enhance the forest, maintain appropriate water levels and water quality, and maintain the fish population and wildlife habitat within the properties. Below you will find a wealth of information in the areas of Lakes and Shorelines, Forest Management, Wildlife, and Invasive Species. Included is additional helpful information and links to topics such as obtaining a permit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality when considering changes to the shoreline area or floodplain on our properties, fishing and hunting regulations as well as fishing regulations specific to the West Maggie, Big Maggie and Little Maggie Lakes. We are always looking for more association members to be involved in the environmental committee. Please contact any MOLA Board Member if you are interested.

Lakes and Streams

The protection of our lakes from invasive species, erosion, and pollutants is vital to maintain water quality, healthy fish populations, and attracting wildlife. Educating oneself on lake ecology and engaging in monitoring programs are ways to understand and better protect our lakes. MLOA is a member of the Michigan Lakes and Streams Association and we participate in the MiCorps Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP). The Michigan Lakes and Steams Association web site https://mymlsa.org/ has many links to understanding lake ecology, management practices, and invasive species prevention and identification. For more information specifically on lake ecology visit the link: Understanding lake ecology https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Understanding_Lake_Ecology.pdf You can find the monitoring reports for the years the program has been active at this link - https://micorps.net/lake- monitoring/individual-lake-reports/.

Invasive Species:

Prevention: It Is Everyone’s Responsibility Preventing invasive species from entering a lake is vital. Many of the public access lakes surrounding our development are contaminated with aggressive, non-native invaders. Aquatic plants and animals such as Eruasian Milfoil and Zebra Mussels can choke out or compete with native plants and animals, decimate fish populations, make boat navigation difficult, and impede recreation. Once established, many invasive species cannot be eradicated. Attempts to remove or control invasive species can be expensive and time consuming. Lake invasive species can also reduce property values. To reduce the risk of contaminating our waters the Maggie Lakes are a CLOSED SYSTEM. This means that each lake frontage property owner should designate the boat(s) for use on the lake their property fronts. This boat should not be used on any other body of water. Outlying parcel owners wishing to access Big Maggie Lake should also have a boat that is only used on Big Maggie and no other body of water. Boats must have a sticker specific for the lake it is to be used on. Other personal watercraft, such as canoes, kayaks and paddleboards should also be specifically designated for each lake and not used on any other body of water. Boat and watercraft stickers can be obtained from the Maggie Lakes Treasurer / Secretary. Identification: Early identification can help in preventing invasive species from becoming established. There are numerous species of invasive plants and animals. For more information follow the link to a Field Guide to Invasive Plants https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Invasive_Plants.p df and a Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Aquatic_Invasive_ Species.pdf

Water Quality:

Many things can affect water quality such as excessive nutrients or pollutants entering the lake or stream. Nutrient sources, such as soil, fertilizer or leaky septic systems can increase phosphorus and nitrogen entering the lake thus promoting algae blooms. Pollutants such as gasoline, oil, or other chemicals can also affect the water quality. Prevention: Erosion control: Erosion of shorelines allows soil, other organic materials and fertilizers to enter the water. Creating or maintaining a buffer zone (natural riparian vegetation) between our homes, lawns and the lake can prevent erosion. Native plants, shrubs, and trees are excellent for a buffer zone. Prevent killing of shoreline vegetation by not storing boats or other objects on the shore. For more information on native shoreline and erosion prevention visit these websites: Natural shoreline landscapes on Michigan’s inland lakes: http://www.hlca.us/pdf/Guidebook%20- %20Michigan%20Shoreline%20Landscapes.pdf Natural shorelines for inland lakes: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/deq/wrd-natural- shorelines-inland-lakes_366530_7.pdf Pollution: Avoid gasoline and oil spills when filling or servicing your boat. Fishing Regulations: Fishing guidelines and regulations have been established for each lake. These guidelines and regulations are to help ensure a healthy and productive fishery now and for future generations. Please read and familiarize yourself, family and guests with these regulations. o Little-Maggie Lake Fishing Regulations o Big Maggie Lake Fishing Regulations o Regulations for West Maggie All residents who fish Big Maggie Lake are encouraged to help generate data on the lake's fish population by participating in our voluntary Fish Survey. The survey form and additional information is in the PDF you can download here.

Forests and Fields

Maintaining the health of our forests and fields is important for attracting wildlife and keeping the aesthetics of our MLOA property. Controlling and preventing invasive species and a forest management plan are important for healthy forests and fields. Invasive species: As with aquatic invasive plants and animals, terrestrial invasive species(those found on land) can choke out or compete with native species. Educating yourself on the identification, prevention, control and removal of these invasive species will improve the quality of your property and the Associations. For information on these aggressive invaders visits these links: o A Field Identification Guide to Invasive Plants in Michigan’s Natural Communities: https://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/invasive- species/InvasivePlantsFieldGuide.pdf o The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN): https://www.misin.msu.edu/apps/ Field guide to invasive plants. This link has both terrestrial and aquatic invasive plants: https://mymlsa.org/wp- content/uploads/2011/06/Field_Guide_to_Invasive_Plants.p df Michigan’s Terrestrial Invasive Species State Management Plan: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/Terrestrial_invas ivesp_plan_618659_7.pdf

Forest Management:

Forest management focuses on managing vegetation, restoring ecosystems, reducing hazards, and maintaining forest health. Forests are managed for specific goals and objectives set by the landowner. These objectives may focus on recreation, restoring forest health and fire resiliency or developing wildlife habitat. Forest management planning is a process that usually produces a written management plan. Forests by their nature are long-term enterprises, and the forest owner’s expected outcomes, like the forest conditions many years into the future, require actions today and over time to ensure these outcomes occur. Forest management planning does not always involve management objectives that include timber directly, but most forest management objectives do involve active forest management and timber at least indirectly. For example, timber must be manipulated to achieve wildlife habitat objectives, to produce recreation opportunities, or to produce exceptional vistas. Timber cutting or logging may be part of a forest management plan and can improve the overall health of a forest if done properly. Our protective covenants (#8) prohibit commercial timbering but permit thinning of over mature trees. The association encourages owners to maintain healthy forests on their property and this may include selective timber cutting. The association has specific guidelines on logging, specifically requiring a forest management plan be developed, shared with and approved by the MLOA Board of Directors, before any logging is performed. A good and free place to start if you are thinking about the health of your forest is to contact our county FAP Forester, Carly DeVet. Free services provided by the office include on-site property evaluation, tree and shrub planting recommendations, wildlife habitat enhancement recommendations, and tree insect and disease identification. If you have any questions or are interested in managing your property, call Carly at (906) 236-5108 or (906) 875-3765 or email at fap.iron.baraga@macd.org for a free site visit. For more information the Iron/Baraga Conservation District website is ironbaragacd.org/landowner-forestry If you decide to do a forest management plan, the FAP County Forester can help connect you with a qualified Consulting Forester. For a fee, the forester you choose to work with will write a management plan and help you execute the plan. If your plan includes timber cutting, the forester would select and mark the trees to be cut and would send out bids to loggers in the area to get you the best logging contract. Here is a list of foresters that your Association neighbors have consulted with: Terry Read https://upforestresources.com 906-265-5170 Brock VanOss, VanOss Forestry Services https://vanossforestry.com (906) 874-0777
Maggie Lakes Owners Association assists owners and prospective owners, and also improves and maintains forest, lakes, and streams within its boundaries.
© 2022 Maggie Lakes Owners Association
Maggie Lakes
Time on the lake restores the soul!
Maggie Lakes Owners - Time on the lake restores the soul!
Lake near Alpha, Lakeside Property, Crystal Falls Lake to Live on, Available property on a lake, no wak lake to live on, private lake to live on, live on lake with no public access